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Intel Customer Support refuse to replace my 5960x

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Guest george.kokovinis
it is bs, because intel can scan the little bar on the PCB and get all the information about the CPU

 

 

Allen said it all:ws:

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Try wiping the heatspreader with some < 10% hydrochlorid acid for couple of minutes. It should remove the gallium residue / oxidation. After wiping it with the acid, clean the acid residue first with water and then again with alcohol. The send it back to Intel.

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Try wiping the heatspreader with some < 10% hydrochlorid acid for couple of minutes. It should remove the gallium residue / oxidation. After wiping it with the acid, clean the acid residue first with water and then again with alcohol. The send it back to Intel.

 

69a63397bf7e6ee5.jpg

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If chemicals don't work you could try some rubbing compound. I would start with some medium duty and then go heavier or lighter as needed.

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If chemicals don't work you could try some rubbing compound. I would start with some medium duty and then go heavier or lighter as needed.

 

This should work to clean up the un-eveness at the top and bottom and make that ihs look new again. For any blotches that are giving problems clay bar will probably grab the gallium residue best. Great idea Stilt that looks great. I've had good results cleaning underside of ihs with Goof Off graffiti remover. Good Luck !

 

Goof Off 18 oz. Professional Strength Graffiti Remover-FG672 - The Home Depot

 

Looks like this article agrees with Stilt, that Hydrochloric Acid Vapor is best at removing Surface Modification from Gallium-Based Liquid Metal

 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/233837511_Recovery_of_Nonwetting_Characteristics_by_Surface_Modification_of_Gallium-Based_Liquid_Metal_Droplets_Using_Hydrochloric_Acid_Vapor

Edited by GtiJason

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Today I played with The Stilt's solution again:

 

60c822aac7b36bdc.JPG

 

Do you think this will be enough for a third RMA attempt?

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Looks way better,now they can see the last 4 letter of s/n matching the ones on pcb,should give you better odds,try to clean a little bit better the S/n and i think you are good to go.

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Looks way better,now they can see the last 4 letter of s/n matching the ones on pcb,should give you better odds,try to clean a little bit better the S/n and i think you are good to go.

 

Once CPU was rejected - you can't RMA it again, it's marked in the system... unless you are a special person ^^

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Once CPU was rejected - you can't RMA it again, it's marked in the system... unless you are a special person ^^

 

Except, how can they know it was that CPU When they cant read it?

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Except, how can they know it was that CPU When they cant read it?

 

See post #25. ;)

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it is bs, because intel can scan the little bar on the PCB and get all the information about the CPU

 

SORRY!

i am confused!

are u saying that they can access to frq and voltage history that we apply on chip ? is it possible?

or just factory info about chip?

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SORRY!

i am confused!

are u saying that they can access to frq and voltage history that we apply on chip ? is it possible?

or just factory info about chip?

 

Just the factory info, probably what cpu it is, the batch info/where it's made to determine what marked it was intended to be sold in.

 

Basically saying who cares if you can't read the info on the ihs clearly because it can be found by scanning the pcb

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That's correct they can scan the CPUs. Even if you send them a sanded/lapped processor, they can identify it.

 

The problem here is that they consider the HS to be physically damaged enough.

 

What you could try to play with is this:

- The processor was not physically damaged.

- The TIM used was Liquid Metal type and this is the reason why the HS looks like this.

- You tried to clean it as much as you could without damaging the processor and this is the result.

- They can identify the processor.

 

=> The processor was not sanded, those are not sanding marks but TIM residue you didn't want to remove in fear of physically damage it.

 

Ask them politely to clean it :D

 

This is Intel's Warranty Policy for Processors:

http://download.intel.com/support/processors/sb/Limited_Warranty_8.5x11_for_Web_English.pdf

 

This is the only reason I can find why they rejected it: "where the original identification markings have been removed, altered or obliterated". But technically, the markings have not been removed nor altered nor obliterated, the markings are just below a layer of TIM.

 

EDIT: Just read the part where you cleaned it with The Stilt's solution. Now it looks way better, just like a CPU with some concrete TIM you find in OEM. If they reject it again because it was previously rejected. Kindly ask them to reconsider since they were wrong the first time and now you managed to clean it better. You could even link them the thread as a last resort.

Edited by Christian Ney

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Intel is kinda strict about IHS appereance, I had several RMA rejects of even low cost CPU because just a scratch on IHS and it didn't even interfere in those markings on IHS.

 

It's simple, with every approved RMA, Intel loose money and why would they do it if they don't have to :) And like XA said, if you're traing RMA same way as before just with cleaner IHS, it will fail directly at the scan.

 

My offer still stands OLDcomer :)

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Coolers always scratch the HS surface, no matter what you do. That should fall under "normal operation degradation" (I dont remember the exact term).

Edited by Christian Ney

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Great Success! Intel will replace my 5960X. I've just received SMS message with information about the delivery date.

 

Many thanks to The Stilt and his solution!

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